While the #MeToo movement has dramatically shifted the national dialogue on sexual harassment and assault in recent months, President Donald Trump once again proved impervious to such evolution on Wednesday when he stated he has a “very hard to imaginining that anything happened” after being asked by a reporter about the accusations levied by professor Christine Blasey Ford against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

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While women’s rights advocates say it is well past time that credible allegations be taken seriously and that women who come forward be believed and treated with dignity, Trump on Tuesday placed his sympathies not with Ford, the accuser, but with Kavanaugh, the accused, when he said that he felt “so badly” for his nominee but expressed no such sympathy for the woman who says that during the attack—which she says took place at a high school party—she feared that Kavanaugh “might inadvertently kill me” when he put his hand over her mouth and smothered her when she began screaming.

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Trump, who more than a dozen women have accused of sexually harassing or assaulting them, has a history of denigrating the #MeToo movement and discounting those who have accused men, including himself, of unwanted sexual advances or worse.

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